History of Arizona.
Read Online
Share

History of Arizona.

  • 795 Want to read
  • ·
  • 73 Currently reading

Published by Lewis Historical Pub. Co. in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Arizona

Subjects:

  • Arizona -- History.,
  • Arizona -- Biography.

Book details:

Edition Notes

GenreBiography.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsF811 .P4
The Physical Object
Pagination3 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6260534M
LC Control Number58042516
OCLC/WorldCa3502300

Download History of Arizona.

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

The History Press; Format Hardback; Paperback; Postcard Pack; Arizona Books 1 - 16 of total 16 per page. 16 Per Page; 32 Per Page; 48 Per Page; Sort By Best Match. Publication Date; Title A-Z; Title Z-A; AZ Goodyear. $ AZ Ash Fork. $ AZ Early Phoenix. $ AZ. This was a required text for my 'History of Arizona' course. A well written book in that it recounts the history of the state of Arizona in a manner of good-storytelling rather than the mundane recitation of historical facts. If one has a casual interest in the history of Arizona then this would be a great book to get/5(13). Arizona's secretary of state, Jan Brewer, a Republican, succeeded her, and was elected to the office in ; Doug Ducey, also a Republican, was elected in Arizona's educational institutions include the Univ. of Arizona, at Tucson; Arizona State Univ., at Tempe; Northern Arizona Univ., at Flagstaff; and several private institutions. History. Thomas E. Sheridan's Arizona is an excellent history of the forty-eighth state from prehistory through the present day. Despite its harsh desert climate, a wide variety of people have inhabited the area that is now Arizona over the l years, including Native Americans, the Spanish, Mexicans and other Hispanic peoples, African Americans and, ultimately, the Anglo Americans 4/5.

Town of Clifton Arizona. South Clifton around The main points are from bottom left: company baseball field, next to the field is the Arizona Copper Company store, center left is the Clifton Armory, at the base of the mountain at right center is the South Clifton School, to the right of that is the county courthouse and jail, and at the extreme right is Clifton High School.   No other book on Arizona history is as integrative or comprehensive. From stone spear points more t years old to the boom and bust of the housing market in the first decade of this century, Arizona: A History explores the ways in which Native Americans, Hispanics, African Americans, Asians, and Anglos have inhabited and exploited Arizona.5/5(1). Coronavirus Information. Until further notice, the University of Arizona, in accordance with the guidelines recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, encourages all employees to work remotely. Our office is closed to the public, but you can reach the Department of History, Monday–Friday 8am-5pm, at or by email to [email protected] Arizona Highways Store West Lewis Avenue Phoenix, AZ USA.

The Journal of Arizona History Each issue of The Journal of Arizona History features original research articles and an extensive book review section that focuses on new works on Arizona, the American West, and the border region. A subscription to the journal is a benefit of Arizona Historical Society membership. Members also receive access to archived issues through . No other book on Arizona history is as integrative or comprehensive. From stone spear points more t years old to the boom and bust of the housing market in the first decade of this century, Arizona: A History explores the ways in which Native Americans, Hispanics, African Americans, Asians, and Anglos have inhabited and exploited Arizona. The history of Phoenix, Arizona, goes back millennia, beginning with nomadic paleo-Indians who existed in the Americas in general, and the Salt River Valley in particular, about 9, years ago until about 6, BC. Mammoths were the primary prey of hunters. As that prey moved eastward, they followed, vacating the area. Other nomadic tribes (archaic Indians) moved into the area, . “The Saguaro Cactus is an extraordinary book written by extraordinary people. The authors not only summarize all you need to know about this iconic cactus, they share a wealth of new information about its relationship with the Sonoran Desert.”—David E. Brown, Natural History Collections, Arizona State University.